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20131202
20131210
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Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)
. >> the u.s. national security agency is gathering billions of records from mobile phones worldwide according to leaked top secret documents given to the paper by former edward snowden. the report says 5 bill yop records every 24 hours allows u.s. intelligence officials to track the movement of people in ways that were unimaginable. using tools such as code traveller, which can map relationships geographically with people and their most. american people say it is legal. it's a breach of privacy. let's discuss it with the ceo of spark digital, a digital marketing and social media company. to know the n.s.a. is spying on people using their mobile phones, sure that is no surprise. what is interesting about that to you. >> what is interesting is what they are tracking. date, time, speed, trajectory. that's what they are keeping historical records of. what is a lot of people don't know is they are not just looking at it just at this moment, but backwards in time when the phone came online. >> code traveller, meaning they can work out which group of people from in proximity to each other.
the u.s. national security agency is collecting billions of records of mobile phone locations from around the world every day. it is provided by edward snowden. we explain how a horrible phone can be turned into a tracking device. >> wherever you are in the world, as soon as you switch on your mobile phone, it tries to connect to the mobile network at the closest tower. when it does, your phone number is logged by the network, along with the tower you connected to, which means your location. if you're on the move, anyone with access to this information can track your route. the latest revelations suggest the n.s.a. is doing much more than just tracking individual suspects. by gathering and processing around 5 billion records each day, it is able to see which individuals are meeting or tracking together. >> you might be connected to a tower along with 100 other people. you move down the street and automatically you, fuel find connects to the next closest tower. let's say 20 of the 100 are moving the same direction you. move further down the road and say just five of the original 100
.s. national security agency is directing billions of records of mobile phone locations every day. how a mobile phone can be turned into a tracking device. >> wherever you are in the world, as soon as you switch on your mobile phone, it tries to connect to the mobile network. usually through the closest tower. as soon as it does, your phone number is logged with the network, along with which tower you have connected to. which means your location. >> if you are on the move, anyone with tract your rout. by gathering and processing 5 billion records each day, to see which individuals are traveling or meeting together. here is how it works. >> you may be connected to a tower, along with 100 other people. you move down the street, and automatically connects to the next closest tower. say 20 of the 100 are moving in the same direction you move further down the road, and say just five of the original 100 people, join you. a couple more towers and some time later just one person who is mirrored your movements. the assumption, you have some reason for being together. >> it raise as lot of question. it c
's the number of cell phone records the national security agency is reportedly collecting every day. that's five billion per day with a b. top secret do you means leaked by edward snowden reportedly show that they contract individuals and map their relationships. the agency said they collect data incidentally and not deliberately. next number, $5,000, actually it's $5,000 and a car is the amount rob ford reportedly offered a drug dealer in exchange for a potentially incriminating video that showed the mayor smoke smoking crack. the dealer refused to sell the video and wanted to hold on to the insurance policy. three is the number of times dennis rodman will have traveled to north korea. he announced he planned to go back on december 18th. he is training the north korean basketball team for a match. we say game in america. a game in january. rodman developed a close friendship with the dictator kim jung un. 28 inches is how much snow has been dropped in the last 24 hours in part parts of the midwest. two harbors. minnesota got slammed. that's a town there. schools are closed and roads are impassi
. and the "washington post" reported the national security agency collects roughly five billion records a day on the location of cell phones worldwide, based on documents leaked by former n.s.a. contractor edward snowden. >> woodruff: on the "newshour" online right now, archaeologists have discovered that we're all mutts. new tests on the oldest-known human d.n.a. reveal that homo sapiens have more ancestors than we had previously thought. read about that on our science page. all that and more is on our website newshour.pbs.org. >> ifill: and that's the "newshour" for tonight. on thursday, fast-food workers plan strikes in 100 cities across the country to protest low-wages. i'm gwen ifill. >> woodruff: and i'm judy woodruff. we'll see you online and again here tomorrow evening. for all of us here at the "pbs newshour," thank you and good night. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> support also comes from carnegie corporation of new york, a foundation created to do what andrew carnegie calle
security agency tracking cell phone locations gathering 5 billion records a day. evidently americans' cell phones overseas aren't being repd. more from edward snowden. joining me justice correspondent pete williams. pete, this is collecting data. then if they want to they can do back and see where your cell phone was used. is that basically -- they are not tracking us overseas in realtime when we use our cell phones? >> the term "tracking" used to describe is something of a misnomer, it's not realtime. it's storing the record of where the cell phone was when the call was made. as you say, this was outside united states. the nsa does this the capability to gather data inside but it has not, chosen not to do it but it does track it outside the u.s. it's part of what is in the database of phone calls. go back and try to reconstruct where someone was or try to develop relationships, see who was in a certain place where maybe something bad happened, who was around a person the time the call was made, that data. they say it's valuable to gather information on suspected terror cells overseas. as
. >>> new details about how the national security agency gathers nearly 5 billion cell phone records around the world every day. those records are put into a huge database that contract the movements of individuals, map their relationships, how they're connected work they're calling were creates a web of information. >> bringing in our pentagon correspondent, barbara starr, on this story because, barbara, you hear about all of this, the cell phone locations and who they're trying to trace, is it americans, americans living abroad, how expansive is this, if you're overseas and you're on the phone? >> reporter: well, we don't know a lot about how expansive it is. "the washington post" reporting that this all came from more leaks by, guess who, edward snowden and documents that he had, and that is it about 5 billion cell phone records a day. how much does it affect americans? well, by all accounts, if you're an american, you're out of the country on business or may vation, you pick up your cell phone, use it, that call that record of that call, not the conversation itself, is most likely to be
to restrict the surveillance by the national security agency? >> i would like to apply the fourth amendment to third party records. so when i have a contract with a phone company, i think those are still my records and you can look at them if you're from the government if you ask a judge. a warrant applies to one person. not to everyone in america. it's absolutely against the spirit and the letter of the fourth amendment to say that a judge can write one warrant and you can get every phone call in america and that's what's happening. i think it's wrong. it goes against everything america stands for and i will help to fight that all the way to the support. we need to get the supreme court to re-examine our records. >> so, you would ban if you could, all mass data mining. >> i'm for going after terrorists with every tool we have. i'm not opposed to the nsa, to spying, but i am infavor of the fourth amendment. if you think someone's a terrorist, you call a judge, get a warrant. if that's person's called 100 people, you get 100 more warrants. if they've called 10,000 people, you've got to get 1
. for the record we have asked the national security agency for an interview. we hope to hear from nsa officials at a later time. now, to the central african republic where french troops have begun disarming rival muslim and christian groups. alex thomson of independent television news was with french forces earlier today in the country's capital bangui. he filed this report. >> reporter: now it's for real on the streets of the capital. disarming the seleka militias, the number one objective says the french military commander. from dawn they set about it. on the ground, on the ground. one pistol and some cartridges off the streets. but these men were eventually allowed to go free. it is the law of diminishing returns. the word soon gets around amongst the militia that the french are here and they avoid the area. what they're basically doing is letting the small fry go but anybody they consider important will be arrested. and so far there've been scores of those this morning. elsewhere, emboldened by the french being here christian mobs now out on the streets, looting anything they can from musli
at the national security agency are not just intercepting calls but also tracking the movements of phones around the world. the paper cites documents leaked by former nsa contractor edward snowden. it says agents collect 5 billion records every day on cell phones across the planet. the report says agents use that information to track people of interest and identify their associates. u.s. government officials say nsa personnel are trying to prevent terrorism and only monitoring non-americans. >>> the pris tij ous hotel in prag has turned a secret cold war underground bunker into a tourist destination. the aim is to show visitors how it was once used as a center for spy operations. the alta hotel recently opened the bunker to mark its 55th anniversary. during the cold war the luxury hotel was a popular destination for both western tourists and journalists. hidden 20 meters under ground it can only be reached by ladder. a hotel official says only a few knew it ever existed. on display is some original spy equipment such as a tape recorder for listening on each of the hotel's 94 rooms, also a floor
phone with their permission on a special app. new reports say the national security agency is running a massive program to track the location of hundreds of millions of cell phones around the world. the nsa collects nearly 5 billion location records a day, almost 58,000 records of call information and other data per expect second. the nsa does it, the post reports, to find unknown associates of people it's targeting for surveillance. >> let's say they're interested in tracking somebody here by the red dot. as that person moves around a path, a certain number of people are going to be following the same general direction. as they move, fewer and fewer people are going down the same exact path. and say fewer people are there and by the time they get to one other location, there's only one person who has been travelng the same path, the green dot right there. >> and they can track when two people arrive at the same location from different directions more than once. cell phones are always emitting location signals, even when you're not making calls and even when your phone is not turned o
a lot in. good to see you. >> thanks. >>> time to show you headlines. the national security agents is not alone in collecting cell phone data. it's used by local and state police. public records show dozens of agencies grab information from phones while in use. >>> in california the american held in north korea made it home. 85-year-old newman spent six weeks of detention in a comfortable hotel. he says he ate well and was bored at times. newman was detained during the ten day visit to north korea. he was freed friday after reading the apology for his you service during the korean war. >>> los angeles times says many attended the memorial for paul walker. walker was the star of "fast & furious" movies. he was k >>> that cold arctic air continues to settle in over the bay area, at least a couple more days here before we start to warm things up. as we look out over the golden gate bridge, mostly clear skies now and going the stay that way all day long, but the temperatures are going to be chilly. by the afternoon, highs expected in the upper 40s and the
edward snowden reveals a massive program by the national security agency to track the location of cell phones around the world. according to "washington post" they are gathering 5 billion records a day on the location of cell phones oversee seas -- overseas. the nsa's tracking program may be the reason that president obama is not allowed to have an iphone. there may be concern that phones could easily reveal his location. apple's smartphone is a favorite of nsa agents because iphone's operating system has 38 different features that can be tracked. >>> 8:16. more incriminating allegations against the mayor of toronto, rob ford. newly-released court documents indicate gang members may have had a video of mayor ford smoking crack cocaine. the documents describe wiretap recordings of gang members talking about black mailing the mayor. reportedly police did recover a copy of the video from a laptop computer. >>> the man accused of a deadly shooting in san francisco over a popular gaming system is due back in court on monday to enter a plea. 21-year-old ronnie collins made his first court ap
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)